Labradoodle Puppy Coat Change – Here Is Everything You Need To Know

Labradoodle puppies have drastically different coats than adult Labradoodles. So, Labradoodle puppy coat change – here is everything you need to know about it.

As cute, soft, and adorable as puppy coats are, they do eventually get replaced with an adult dog’s coat. And that’s ok as adult Labradoodles also have gorgeous and soft coats as well. Their coats are one of the big reasons why Labradors and Poodles were mixed in the first place.

However, the whole process of a puppy switching to its adult coat does lead to quite a few questions. For example, when does the change happen? Are there any possible health complications? Is the shedding too much? Do you need to do anything, and so on, and so on. We’ll address all that below.

When Does The Labradoodle Puppy Coat Change Happen?

A Labradoodle will usually start shedding its puppy coat and grow its first adult coat between its 6th and 12th months. There are three main types of Labradoodle hair coats we’ll discuss in a bit (Fleece, Wool, and Hair) and there are a few differences depending on the type of coat.

There are also individual differences from one puppy to another which are based on the dog’s growth rate, hormonal balance, and so on. All this is normal, however – as long as your puppy is healthy, the Labradoodle puppy coat change will happen within its 6th and 12th month.

What Health Problems Can Happen During Or Due To A Labradoodle Shedding Its Puppy Coat?

The Labradoodle puppy coat change process really isn’t a big strain on the pup’s health and wellbeing. This isn’t nearly as intense as a reptile shedding its skin or even the switch from milk to adult teeth in both dogs and people. Instead, the process is very similar to any normal seasonal coat change in dogs – the old coat is gradually shed and a new coat grows in its place.

The only realistic health complication that can arise from the switch is matting if you don’t help your pup by brushing its old puppy coat away. Because the whole process is gradual and takes months, the new hair that’s growing can get entangled and matted with the old puppy coat that hasn’t yet fallen off.

What Exactly Is Skin Matting?

Matting is simply hairs getting entangled into a mesh that can’t be brushed straight and usually needs to be cut off. This sounds simple and harmless enough but there are some complications.

When a dog’s hair gets matted, it starts trapping moisture underneath it because it prevents the proper airflow to the dog’s skin. This can cause irritations and sores. Additionally, the matting itself can be painful as the matted hair will pull the skin as the dog moves and grows.

What’s worse, if the matting is left unaddressed for too long, it can start cutting the circulation off to your dog’s skin and cause hematomas – a localized collection of blood outside of blood vessels. In the worst cases, you may need to take your dog not just to a groomer but to a veterinarian.

Fortunately, all that is preventable if you just brush your Labradoodle’s hair regularly.

 labradoodle hair coat

Read more about: Lab Mix With Poodle

Do You Need To Help With The Labradoodle Shedding Its Puppy Coat?

If you want to help your dog, all you need to do is get your pup used to a nice 5-minute brushing session per day. Once every 2-3 days would also usually be ok but a daily routine is recommended for the best results. This will help your pup grow its new hair out as easily and problem-free as possible.

Can A Professional Groomer Help Too?

A trip or two to a groomer can certainly be helpful, especially if you start seeing some matting. The same goes later on in the dog’s life before and during seasonal shedding. It shouldn’t be strictly necessary, however, as good brushing and grooming at home can also do the trick.

Learn more about: How Long Do Labradoodles Live and How Do They Compare To Other Breeds

What Grooming Tools Do You Need To Help With The Labradoodles Coats Change?

The items you’d want to get for your pup’s coat change will be useful later on too so it’s not a single-use purchase. The main tools include:

  • A comb, preferably a stainless steel Poodle comb
  • A high-quality slicker brush
  • A de-matting comb
  • A detangler

The latter two can feel unnecessary for some breeds but are a great purchase for Labradoodles and all other Poodle crosses.

Does The Puppy Labradoodle Hair Coat Shed Before The Coat Change Happens?

Typically no, the shedding of the puppy coat is the first major shed dogs go through.

Does The Labradoodle Puppy Coat Change Trigger People’s Allergies?

Contrary to popular belief, it’s not dog hair that triggers people’s allergies. Instead, it’s dog dandruff, saliva, and urine. The pet’s hair is usually what gets those things floating in the air even more but even if the dog isn’t shedding (yet) these allergens will still irritate people’s allergies.

So, no, it’s not the puppy coat change that triggers people’s allergies, although that can make it even worse.

What Are The Main Types Of Labradoodle Hair Coats?

Labradoodles have three main types of adult Labradoodle coats:

  • Fleece coats have a soft texture that’s either spiral or wavy. While very pleasant to the touch, these coats also mat very easily.
  • Hair coats are similar to those of Labradors. They can be wavy, scruffy, or feathering, and they also shed more than other types of coats.
  • Wool coats feel like a lamb’s coat. They can be dense and curly as well as straight and extra dense. This type of coat is best for people with allergies and asthma.

All three types of coats need regular trimming and brushing.

So, Is The Labradoodle Puppy Coat Change A Problem You Should Worry About?

As long as you brush and trim your pup’s hair regularly to prevent matting, the first major coat shed shouldn’t be problematic. If you opt to trim your Labradoodle’s hair you can even cut back on the brushing as it won’t need to be done nearly as often. So, just avoid matting and everything should be just fine.

Read more about: How Much Are Labradoodles Worth In Pet Stores and Breeders?

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